Land and The People

2019 ias preliminary exam test series

LAND AND THE PEOPLE

“INDIA is the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history, the grandmother of legend and the great grandmother of tradition. Our most valuable and most instructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India only.” — Mark Twain.

  • India has a unique culture and is one of the oldest and greatest civilizations of the world. It stretches from the snow-capped Himalayas in the North to sun drenched coastal villages of the South and the humid tropical forests on the south-west coast, from the fertile Brahmaputra valley on its East to the Thar Desert in the West.
  • It covers an area of 32,87,263 sq. km. India is the 7th largest country in the world and ranks 2nd in population.
  • Bounded by the Great Himalayas in the north, it stretches southwards and at the Tropic of Cancer, tapers off into the Indian Ocean between the Bay of Bengal on the east and the Arabian Sea on the west.
  • Lying entirely in the northern hemisphere, the mainland extends between latitudes 8°4′ and 3706 north, longitudes 68°7 and 97°25 east and measures about 3,214 km from north to south between the extreme latitudes and about 2,933 km from east to west between the extreme longitudes.
  • It has a land frontier of about 15,200 km. The total length of the coastline of the mainland, Lakshadweep Islands and Andaman & Nicobar Islands is 7,516.6 km.
  • Countries having a common border with India are Afghanistan and Pakistan to the north-west, China, Bhutan and Nepal to the north, Myanmar to the far east and Bangladesh to the east Sri Lanka is separated from India by a narrow channel of sea formed by the Palk Strait and the Gulf of Mannar.
  • The country can be divided into six zones mainly North, South, East, West, Central and North-east zone. It has 29 states and 7 union territories.

PHYSICAL FEATURES

  • The mainland comprises four regions, namely, the great mountain zone, plains of the Ganga and the Indus, the desert region and the southern peninsula.
  • The Himalayas comprise three almost parallel ranges interspersed with large plateaus and valleys, some of which, like the Kashmir and Kullu valleys, are fertile, extensive and of great scenic beauty.
  • Some of the highest peaks in the world are found in these ranges. The high altitudes admit travel only to a few passes, notably the Jelep La and Nathu La on the main Indo-Tibet trade route through the Chumbi Valley, north-east of Darjeeling and Shipki La in the Satluj valley, north—east of Kalpa (Kinnaur).
  • The mountain wall extends over a distance of about 2,400 km with a varying depth of 240 to 320 km.
  • In the east, between India and Myanmar and India and Bangladesh, hill ranges are much lower.
  • Garo, Khasi, Jaintia and Naga Hills, running almost east-west, join the chain to Mizo and Rkhine Hills running almost east—west, joint the chain to Mizo and Rhine Hills running north-south.
  • The plains of the Ganga and the Indus, about 2,400 km long and 240 to 320 km broad, are formed by basins of three distinct river systems — the Indus, the Ganga and the
  • They are one of the world’s greatest stretches of flat alluvium and also one of the most densely populated areas on the earth. Between the Yamuna at Delhi and the Bay of Bengal, nearly 1,600 km away, there is a drop of only 200 metres in elevation.
  • The desert region can be divided into two parts – the ‘great desert’ and the ‘little desert’.
  • The great desert extends from the edge of the Rann of Kuchch beyond the Luni river northward. The whole of the Rajasthan—Sind frontier runs through this.
  • The little desert extends from the Luni between Jaisalmer and Jodhpur up to the northern west. Between the great and the little deserts lies a zone of absolutely sterile country, consisting of rocky land, cut up by limestone ridges.
  • The Peninsular Plateau is marked off from the plains of the Ganga and the Indus by a mass of mountain and hill ranges varying from 460 to 1,220 metres in height. Prominent among these are the Aravali, Vindhya, Satpura, Maikala and Ajanta.
  • The Peninsula is flanked on the one side by the Eastern Ghats where average elevation is about 610 metres and on the other by the Western Ghats where it is generally from 915 to 1,220 metres, rising in places to over 2,440 metres.
  • Between the Western Ghats and the Arabian Sea lies a narrow coastal strip, while between Eastern Ghats and the Bay of Bengal, there is a broader Coastal area.
  • The southern point of plateau is formed by the Nilgiri Hills where the Eastern and the Western Ghats meet.
  • The Cardamom Hills lying beyond may be regarded as a continuation of the Western Ghats.

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